A Lunchtime Talk with Greg Robinson on his new book, The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches

A Lunchtime Talk with Greg Robinson on his new book, The Great Unknown: Japanese American Sketches

Stanford’s American Studies Program presents a lunchtime talk by

Greg Robinson

Professor of History at Université du Québec à Montréal

 on his new book

The Great Unknown:

 Japanese American Sketches

Thursday, October  27th   The Terrace Room, Margaret Jacks Hall (Bldg 460) Noon   -   Lunch will be provided.

 Please RSVP  to  Rachel Meisels rmeisels@stanford.edu by Oct. 21st 

 

In The Great Unknown, award-winning historian and journalist Greg Robinson offers a fascinating collection of biographical portraits of extraordinary but unheralded figures in Japanese American history: men and women who made remarkable contributions in the arts, literature, law, sports, and other fields.   By focusing attention on exceptional figures who deviated from social norms, Robinson subverts stereotypes of ethnic Japanese and other Asians as conformist or colorless. The collection highlights a set of recurring themes absent from conventional histories—including the lives of Japanese Americans outside the West Coast, the role of women in shaping community life, encounters between Japanese American and African American communities during the struggle for civil rights, and the evolving status of queer community members.  

Greg Robinson is also the author of  A Tragedy of Democracy: Japanese Confinement in North America, After Camp: Portraits in Midcentury Japanese American Life and Politics   and By Order of the President.  

 

 Co-Sponsored by Stanford’s Department of History, Center for East Asian Studies, and Program in Asian American Studies