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Introduction to African American Studies: Black Religion, Culture, and Experience to the Civil War (AFRICAAM 104)

AMSTUD
104A
Instructors
Wells-Oghoghomeh, A. (PI)
Section Number
1
Beginning in 16th century West Africa and ending in the 19th century United States, this course will survey the religious, cultural, and experiential histories of African-descended people in the Atlantic world. From the early histories of the slave trade to the violence of American racial hierarchies, we will delve into the cosmologies, practices, rituals, aesthetics, and other cultural expressions of free and enslaved Africans and their descendants in the Americas, with a particular emphasis on the United States. What did Africa mean to those displaced from their ancestral homelands? How did African descended people perceive, navigate, and resist their racialization? How did they reshape the Americas through their intellect, creativity, and culture? Prioritizing the voices, thought, and sensory registers of the persons involved in these historical processes, this course will explore African Americans' experiences - from the spectacular to the quotidian - as windows into the human experience.
Academic Career
Undergraduate
Grading
Letter (ABCD/NP)
Requirements
WAY-EDP, WAY-SI
Units
5
Course Tags
History and Institutions
Comparative Race and Ethnicity
Academic Year
Quarter
Autumn
Section Days
Monday Wednesday
Start Time
1:30 PM
End Time
2:50 PM
Location
160-120